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"Elam Huddleston"


Elam Huddleston was one of the names listed in the indictment of Champ Ferguson in Nashville, Tenn.; for which he was charged with murder. The bad blood though between Huddleston and Ferguson went back to prior to the war. Ferguson had been swindled in a business transaction concerning some hogs by some men who lived in Fentress County, Tenn. Ferguson received a judgement of sorts to reacquire his property. In the meantime, Ferguson's brother, Jim, and another man took a horse belonging to Alexander Evans (one of the Fentress Co. men) as attachment to the debt.
Champ Ferguson, unaware of this, went to a Camp Meeting near the Lick River in Fentress Co., and there was beset upon by a group of men, including Elam Huddleston. Ferguson physically fought off these men, cutting up Floyd Evans with his knife. Champ later turned himself in to get a trial and to prevent being murdered. Huddleston vowed to kill Champ Ferguson, and when war broke out he joined a regular Union army unit.
However, before long he had withdrawn and formed his own guerrilla band to operate in the Cumberlands. Of the Union guerilla bands in this section during the War, he and Tinker Dave were probably the strongest and most feared.
On New Years Night, 1863; Champ Ferguson, along with some of John Hunt Morgan's men, caught up with Elam Huddleston at his home in Adair County, Ky. Huddleston fired upon the men from the unfinished cabins garret, they in turn set fire to the back of the cabin, and in the ensuing skirmish, Huddleston was shot. He was brought outside, and Champ Ferguson shot him once more. One of Morgan's men claimed Huddleston's horse, a splendid bay mare that could run very fast.

After his death, Huddleston's men became a part of "Tinker Dave" Beatty's command.



You are listening to the Irish ballad
"Rosin the Bow"
adapted in 1860 for Lincoln's campaign by
the abolitionist Hutchinson Family Singers as
"Lincoln and Liberty"
MIDI file created and 1999 by Barry Taylor
Taylors Traditional Tunebook
Used with permission. All rights reserved.

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