The Genealogy of

Adam & Eve, the First Parents

Home

Birth Records

Death Records

Census Records

Marriage Records

Family Search

Search

Ancestors

Descendants

Histories

Menu


Home


Search


Surnames


Ancestors


Descendants


Pedigrees


Histories


Ancient Genealogy


Pleases visit our sponsors:


UCAN


Views & News


Better Built Buildings


Doodlebugs Dresses


Tiny Designs by Sarah


The Pageant Page


Singles Connect


Alabama Jobs


Literature of the Latter-day Saints


   


Descendants of Robert Taylor


 Descendants of Thomas Hancocke


Descendants of William Peacock


Descendants of Adam Wagnon


Descendants of Reuben Lindsey


Ancestors of the John Taylor family


Descendants of Adelicia Princess of BRABANT


Morrell Ancestral Records


Descendants of Isabel (Elizabeth) De BEAUMONT


Descendants of John Mainwaring (Sapp family)


Descendants of Edward I King of England


Descendants of William Parrish


Descendants of William Monk


Descendants of Martin J. Shaw


Taylor pedigree chart


Hancock pedigree chart


Peacock pedigree chart


Warren pedigree chart


Wagnon pedigree chart


Pioneer Families of Georgia


Ivey & Related Families


Descendants of Godwulf from about 80 AD


Descendants of ANSEGIS Mayor of Palace


CHARLEMAGNE "Charles the Great"


History of Charlemagne


History of the Island of Britain


History of Adel, Cook County Georgia


Family History links


Surname List


Georgia Genealogy Home Page


Genealogy Resources Home Page


Pioneer Families of South Georgia


Sheppard, Cash and Hairston families of Georgia, South Carolina and Virginia


 

eXTReMe 

Tracker

 

 

 
Google
 

Free Genealogy Resources of the Descendants of Adam the First Man

Notes


219. Alfred "The Great" King of England

Then two sons of Ethelwulf succeeded to the kingdom, Ethelbald to Wessex, and Ethelbert to Kent,
Essex, Surrey, and Sussex.

Ethelbald reigned five years. Alfred, his third son, Ethelwulf had sent to Rome, and when the Pope heard
say that he was dead, he consecrated Alfred king, and held him under spiritual hands, as his father
Ethelwulf had desired, and for which purpose he had sent him thither.

ALFRED THE GREAT

Wessex

Ethelred


(848?-899). The course of English history would have been very different had it not been for King Alfred. He won renown both as a statesman and as a warrior and is justly called "the Great."
The England of Alfred's time was a country of four small Saxon kingdoms. The strongest was Wessex, in the south. Born in about 848, Alfred was the youngest son of Ethelwulf, king of Wessex. Each of Alfred's three older brothers, in turn, ruled the kingdom. Alfred was by temperament a scholar, and his health was never robust.

Nevertheless in his early youth he fought with his brother Ethelred against Danish invaders. Alfred was 23 when Ethelred died, but he had already won the confidence of the army and was at once acclaimed king in 871. By this time the Danes, or Vikings, had penetrated to all parts of the island. Three of the Saxon kingdoms--Northumbria, Mercia, and East Anglia--had one after another fallen to the Danish invaders.

Under Alfred's leadership, the Saxons again found courage. The worst crisis came in the winter of 877, when the Danish king, Guthrum, invaded Wessex with his army. In 878 Alfred was defeated at Chippenham, where he was celebrating Christmas, and was forced to go into hiding.

A few months later he forced Guthrum to surrender at Chippenham. The Danes agreed to make the Thames River and the old Roman road called Watling Street the boundary between Alfred's kingdom and the Danish lands to the north. The treaty, however, did not assure permanent peace. The Danes assaulted London and the coast towns repeatedly. In about 896 they finally admitted defeat and ceased their struggle for a foothold in southern England.

Alfred was much more than the defender of his country. He took a keen interest in law and order and was concerned with the improvement of the cultural standards of his people. He encouraged industries of all kinds and rebuilt London, which had been partly destroyed by the Danes. He collected and revised the old laws of the kingdom. He invited learned men from other countries to instruct the people because even the clergy of Wessex no longer knew Latin, the international language of the church. He established a school similar to the Palace School of Charlemagne.

The " books most necessary for all men to know" were translated from Latin into English so that the people might read them. Alfred himself took a part in preparing the translations. The `Anglo-Saxon Chronicle' was probably begun under his direction.

Alfred died at the age of about 51 in 899. He was in no sense a true king of England, for he ruled less than half of the island. After his death, however, his capable son, Edward the Elder, and his grandsons extended their rule over all of England.


Look for your Taylor's at this Sapp Genealogy new Site!